free spins and coin links-'Safety Is Always First': NASA Reschedules Artemis Moon Mission To Saturday

PokerGame 2022-09-25 08:50:33 4528

NASA rescheduled the launch of its Artemis I mission around the moon to Saturday after the space agency was forced to scrub the first attempt due to an issue with one of the spacecraft’s engines.

The main problem Monday came after engineers couldn’t get one of the rocket’s four engines to the proper temperature needed to start them at liftoff. NASA said the Artemis team tried to quickly fix the issue before the scheduled departure time, but weren’t able to do so before a two-hour launch window closed.

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Mike Sarafin, the Artemis mission manager, said the team had found a path forward, including changing the engines’ loading procedure and starting the engine chill down earlier.

The mission is the first in a series of launches that could ultimately see astronauts headed toward the moon for the first time in half a century and a major revitalization of NASA’s space exploration efforts.

The next launch window opens at 2:17 p.m. ET Saturday for two hours, weather permitting. An additional window would open on Monday, NASA said.

If the mission isn’t able to launch, it could potentially be pushed back by more than a month.

Teams have reviewed the data from Monday's launch attempt of the #Artemis I mission and are moving forward with a second launch attempt on Sat., Sept. 3, with a two-hour launch window starting at 2:17 p.m. EDT (18:17 UTC). pic.twitter.com/oDr5plGhqS

— NASA Artemis (@NASAArtemis) August 30, 2022
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The decision Monday was a disappointment for thousands of rocket-watchers who drove to Florida’s Kennedy Space Center, including Vice President Kamala Harris. But NASA said it wouldn’t fire up the rocket until doing so was safe, despite years of delays that have beleaguered the $40 billion project.

While we hoped to see the launch of Artemis I today, the attempt provided valuable data as we test the most powerful rocket in history. Our commitment to the Artemis Program remains firm, and we will return to the moon.

— Vice President Kamala Harris (@VP) August 29, 2022

#Artemis1 was delayed due to an engine bleed issue, but testing is part of the process. #Artemis2 will carry @NASA_Astronauts, so we need to ensure we get it right. Incredibly honored to have shared moments with @VP @KamalaHarris and the @Globies as we progress toward the Moon. pic.twitter.com/sMqwEw5Wup

— Jessica Meir (@Astro_Jessica) August 29, 2022

Sarafin told reporters Monday engineers would be sifting through data from the first attempt to make sure everything was in order.

“We’re going to play all nine innings here,” Sarafin said during a press briefing on Monday night. “We’re not ready to give up yet.”

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NASA's Artemis 1 rocket sits at pad 39-B at the Kennedy Space Center hours before a scheduled launch on Monday in Cape Canaveral, Florida. The launch of the moon rocket was postponed due to an issue with one of the rocket's engines.
NASA's Artemis 1 rocket sits at pad 39-B at the Kennedy Space Center hours before a scheduled launch on Monday in Cape Canaveral, Florida. The launch of the moon rocket was postponed due to an issue with one of the rocket's engines.
Photo by Paul Hennessy/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images
NASA's next-generation moon rocket, the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket with its Orion crew capsule perched on top, stands on launch pad 39-B in preparation for the Artemis 1 mission, at Cape Canaveral, Florida.
NASA's next-generation moon rocket, the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket with its Orion crew capsule perched on top, stands on launch pad 39-B in preparation for the Artemis 1 mission, at Cape Canaveral, Florida.
Steve Nesius via Reuters

“We are going to give the team time to rest, first of all, and then come back fresh tomorrow and reassess what we learned today and then develop a series of options,” he added. “It’s too early to say what the options are.”

Bill Nelson, NASA’s administrator, said the rocket was “brand new,” adding it wouldn’t “fly until it’s ready.”

“I think it’s just illustrative that this is a very complicated machine, a very complicated system, and all those things have to work,” Nelson said during the press conference Monday.

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The Artemis mission will test NASA’s Space Launch System, a powerful rocket, that will propel the Orion spacecraft beyond the moon. The mission will be unmanned (holding three humanoid dummies), but the Orion craft will eventually be able to hold astronauts and begin a new era of space exploration. Humans haven’t stepped foot on the moon since the last Apollo mission in 1972, and NASA has pledged future efforts would see the first woman and the first person of color step foot on the lunar surface.

When it does eventually leave, Artemis I will orbit the Earth before being propelled towards the moon. The spacecraft will fly within 60 miles of the moon’s surface as NASA monitors its systems, then go on into deep retrograde orbit for just under a week.

The full mission will last four to six weeks before the Orion spacecraft reenters the Earth’s atmosphere, traveling some 25,000 mph and producing temperatures approaching 5,000 degrees Fahrenheit.

“After about four to six weeks and a total distance traveled exceeding 1.3 million miles, the mission will end with a test of Orion’s capability to return safely to the Earth,” NASA says of the mission.

The Artemis I launch, if it moves forward, will cap an invigorating summer for the country’s space agency. The heralded James Webb Space Telescope has been transmitting magical images from deep space since July, stunning cosmologists and astronomers and ushering in a new era of stargazing.

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Safety is always first. Following today's #Artemis I launch attempt, @NASAArtemis teams are working through an issue with engine number 3, and expect to give a news briefing later today. Stay tuned for broadcast details. https://t.co/z1RgZwQkWS pic.twitter.com/BxpIOGyId9

— NASA (@NASA) August 29, 2022

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Nick Visser - Senior Reporter, HuffPost

Nick Visser

Senior Reporter, HuffPost

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